NR: Meet Me On Holodeck 3

James here with Wednesday’s News Reflections.

Today, piggy-backing off Collider’s report, I’m talking about 3D‘s evolution.  Thanks chiefly to James Cameron, nearly every major Hollywood player has bet it all on 3D.  I’ve been down on the technology in the past, as I prefer classic cinematography, but it is quite seductive.  Its justifies its existence by excellence and its potential to evolve into a daughter medium. Now, due to such innovators as Apple and Nintendo, the technology is outgrowing the need for uncomfortable, dimming glasses. Heck, in twenty years, my kids might be asking me for a holodeck without safeties.

Okay, so that’s unlikely for several reasons, but it’s clear the virtual world is outgrowing its bounds and establishing a beachhead in reality. We won’t dodge Agent Smith in The Matrix, we’ll be dodging him in the suburbs.

Okay, so that’s highly unlikely, too, but tongue-in-cheek exaggeration aside, in a world economy fueled by ever-accelerating demand, 3D tech is sure to develop into a new brand of escapist virtuality easily distinguishable from cinema. Traditional films may find themselves in the place still photography is now to motion pictures; not disregarded by any means, but perhaps playing a semi-ancillary role to the “highest” medium, whatever we call 3D then. Obvious, this new virtuality effects video games as well. Just as older, simpler forms of gaming remain popular as increasingly complex systems grow, it’s likely that 2D gaming will survive, but in my mind’s eye, the effects on the gaming industry will be far more profound.

Whatever the case, it’s not necessary for film lovers to bemoan the inevitable rise of 3D, but it’s probably a good idea to catch up on William Gibson and Philip K. Dick novels, for when things get weird.

NR: Snyder’s Superman

James here.

This is the first article in a new series, News Reflections, here on The Silver Mirror.  When we see something intriguing coming down the wire, we give some commentary, weigh pros and cons, wag a prophetic finger if necessary.  Expect updates bi-weekly, Wednesday and Friday.

First up, thanks to Collider, we have the news that executive producer Christopher Nolan is stepping away from active involvement in the ‘Superman’ reboot to focus on directing ‘The Dark Knight Rises’.

This leaves the reboot entirely in Zack Snyder’s hands.  Yes, we knew this would happen eventually.  Somebody has to take the reins.

Superman, as I expressed in my review of the 1978 classic, is heroic idealism anthropomorphized.  He’s the guy who always wins, and he’s such a swell guy, too.  Also in my review, I directly contrasted him with Alan Moore’s cynical, nihilistic ‘Watchmen’ and its film adaptation, directed by Snyder.  I do find it amusing that Snyder, responsible for bringing Superman’s antithesis to the screen, is now interpreting the Big Blue Boy Scout for a new generation.  I don’t want to imply that Zack Snyder is the wrong man for the job.  He’s got a brilliant visual sensibility and manages to get believable emotions out of actors working in an effects-heavy environment.  My fear is, because he shows more affection for gritty, postmodern graphic novels than the optimistic pre-Cold War comic books of Superman’s heyday, he may not succeed in communicating the character’s essence.  Not being familiar with the gamut of Superman’s run in print, my main reference points are in film, particularly the superb Max Fleischer cartoons and the Richard Donner classic.  Getting to the point, I must confess my bias is towards the Fleischer cartoons and their pliable, World-of-Tomorrow aesthetic, and I have no wish to see a cynical, brutal re-imagining of the childhood icon.

The World’s Fair-inspired art in the 40’s cartoons has thematic resonance with the character’s soul.  Superman is sometimes aptly named the Man of Tomorrow.  He represents what the artists believe is best in humanity and what will allow us to flourish in an uncertain, often dangerous world defined by technological innovation.  It’s an important symbol, what with humankind evolving into a hybrid race with the digital world, eerily close to the predictions of such novelists as William Gibson.   It makes sense that Lex Luthor, the evil, ambitious businessman, is the most popular villain in Superman’s canon.  He represents innovation, spurred by capitalism, gone amuck.  Lex is the cynic.  Superman is the optimist.

Does Zack Snyder understand Superman?  Can he rightfully interpret the character, as Christopher Nolan promised, in a modern context?  We won’t know until the film plays in 2012.  There’s a lot on Snyder’s shoulders now.  He could either inspire a generation, or drag it further into the muck.  With the future coming faster than ever, we can’t afford the latter.